This Month In JavaScript – 2006.7

“Timeline is a DHTML-based AJAXy widget for visualizing time-based events. It is like Google Maps for time-based information. Below is a live example that you can play with. Pan the timeline by dragging it horizontally.”

http://simile.mit.edu/timeline/


“Slightly ThickerBox is a modification of Cody Lindley’s Thickbox script. I modified it for use on my Jason’s Toolbox Redesign. The modifications allow the script to generate “Previous Image” and “Next Image” links. The result is that you can use Slightly ThickerBox to create image galleries. In addition, you can create groups of galleries by setting a “rel” attribute on the links. (I also moved the Caption and Close link to the top and made the script case insensitive.)”

http://www.jasons-toolbox.com/SlightlyThickerBox/


Cool Google IG style JavaScript widget.

http://ajaxian.com/archives/echo2-widget-panel


“The World Wide Web consortium’s (W3C) CSS working group recently released a draft of a new multi column layout module–to be included (with possible modifications) into the CSS 3 specs. For those web developers that have been lamenting the lack of adequate multi column support in current supported versions of the CSS specs, this is an exciting and welcome addition.”

http://blogs.pathf.com/uxd/2006/07/multi_column_la_1.html


“Ever wanted to match the look of your HTML forms with the rest of your website’ This article demonstrates how to apply customized backgrounds to HTML forms, while preserving stucturally clean markup and accesibility.”

http://www.picment.com/articles/css/funwithforms/


“The use of embed has gone on too long. Wishing for it to become part of the official specs is like wishing your partner would start putting the cap on the toothpaste. It’s not going to happen. It’s time to move on. If you want to validate your website, you have to get rid of embed. In this article, I’ll show you how.”

http://www.alistapart.com/articles/byebyeembed


‘Every once in a long while, I read about an idea that is a stroke of brilliance, and I think to myself, “I wish I had thought of that, it’s genius!” Microformats are just that kind of idea. You see, for a while now, people have tried to extract structured data from the unstructured Web. You hear glimmers of these when people talk about the “semantic Web,” a Web in which data is separated from formatting. But for whatever reason, the semantic Web hasn’t taken off, and the problem of finding structured data in an unstructured world remains.’

http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/library/x-microformats/’ca=dgr-lnxw01Microformats


“JavaScript is hip again; there’s no doubt about it. But if you’re starting to get down and dirty with it, there’s no excuse not to keep it clean.”

http://www.thinkvitamin.com/features/dev/the-importance-of-maintainable-javascript


“A little bit JavaScript, a little bit CSS and a little bit clairvoyance, Link Thumbnail shows users that are about to leave your site exactly where they’re going. When that curious mouse pointer hovers over a link pointing to somewhere outside of your site, the script displays a small image of the destination page. It’s a nice visual cue that serves a very real purpose: providing a clearer picture (no pun intended) of what’s ahead.”

http://lab.arc90.com/2006/07/link_thumbnail.php


“The Javascript Sound Kit is a wrapper around the ActionScript Sound Object, it makes it possible to use the Sound Object in Javascript the same way you do it in ActionScript.”

http://jssoundkit.sourceforge.net/


“Rails must be spoiling me. Every time I have to write ugly code, I wonder: could the language be different’

I wondered just that about CSS while making some Backpack Calendar styles work across browsers. Hacks are ugly. What if I could just type a special selector, based on the name of the current browser'”

http://37signals.com/svn/archives2/browser_selectors_in_css.php


“One drawback of working with AJAX is that an AJAX-based client cannot make calls to URLs outside of its domain, which means that it cannot access services located on another server. A technique such as JSONP can help in this regard, but it has some limitations. One limitation is that including third-party JavaScript inside script elements exposes your application to potential security risks because you are allowing external parties to interact with your client.

To overcome these problems, you need a generic proxy that can communicate with external services on your client’s behalf. The proxy passes a call from your client application to the service, receives the content in response from the service, and returns the content to your client. You can then use this content in your AJAX-based application.”

http://weblogs.java.net/blog/gmurray71/archive/2006/07/the_xmlhttpprox_1.html


“Which New Browser Is Best: Firefox 2, Internet Explorer 7, or Opera 9′ “

http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,1558,1990850,00.asp


“Web applications are becoming more and more like “normal” desktop applications. Of course, they are more and more functional, but smooth user interface acts the primary role. So we have drag and drop, autocompletition, and much more. Many of those nice features got possible only with help of AJAX.

This page, however, is not about AJAX (or any other buzzword). It is about rather simple user input method — mouse wheel. I believe it would now be difficult to find a mouse without wheel. Vast majority of users are used to the wheel as a control for scrolling in lists, zooming etc. Rather few web applications, however, make smart use of mouse wheel. This page is to provide you with general information about handling mouse wheel-generated events in JavaScript programming language”

http://adomas.org/javascript-mouse-wheel/


“JavaScript malware is opening the door for hackers to attack internal networks.”

http://it.slashdot.org/article.pl’sid=06/07/30/0547227&from=rss

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About metawrap

CTO Massive Interactive. Ex Computer Whiz Kid - Now Grumpy Old Guru.
This entry was posted in JavaScript, Web2.0. Bookmark the permalink.

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